The Top 59 Countries Where Meditation Is Most Popular

  • By: Ryan Kane
  • Updated: February 9, 2022
  • Time to read: 3 min.

Meditation has been growing in popularity around the world for decades now.

And of course, meditation has historical roots in countries like India, China, Korea and Japan.

But what countries are practicing meditation the most today?

While no reliable global surveys have been done on the popularity of meditation across the world, we can understand its relative popularity across countries through a source that’s been collecting data for a couple of decades now: Google Trends.

Let’s jump to the top countries for meditation, and then circle back to methodology that determined them.

The 59 most popular countries for meditation around the world

Here’s a map of the most popular countries for meditation around the world:

Most Popular Countries for Meditation Around the World
Countries around the world ranked by relative popularity of meditation (Source: Google Trends)

The most popular country for meditation around the world is Australia.

  1. Australia
  2. Ireland
  3. Nepal
  4. Canada
  5. Vietnam
  6. New Zealand
  7. Switzerland
  8. India
  9. United States
  10. Portugal
  11. Sri Lanka
  12. Singapore
  13. United Kingdom
  14. South Africa
  15. Denmark
  16. Austria
  17. Brazil
  18. Sweden
  19. Germany
  20. United Arab Emirates
  21. France
  22. Bulgaria
  23. Hong Kong
  24. Kazakhstan
  25. Kenya
  26. Russia
  27. Ukraine
  28. Malaysia
  29. Belgium
  30. Norway
  31. Belarus
  32. Philippines
  33. Israel
  34. Japan
  35. Taiwan
  36. Bangladesh
  37. Netherlands
  38. Spain
  39. Nigeria
  40. Indonesia
  41. Finland
  42. Greece
  43. Pakistan
  44. Thailand
  45. Argentina
  46. Mexico
  47. Colombia
  48. Chile
  49. Romania
  50. Egypt
  51. Hungary
  52. Saudi Arabia
  53. South Korea
  54. Peru
  55. China
  56. Italy
  57. Iran
  58. Poland
  59. Turkey
Relative Popularity of Meditation by Country MB
Countries ranked by relative popularity of meditation (Source: Google Trends)

Using relative popularity to determine the top countries for meditation

With Google Trends, it’s possible to gather data based on relative popularity.

In our case, this means that the number of searches for meditation is weighed against the total number of searches in the country.

That helps make sure the search volume from high population countries like Brazil aren’t drowning out lower population countries like Singapore.

How we adjusted for multiple languages

A challenge in producing this data is accounting for multiple languages, since of course, people are likely to search for “meditation” in their own language rather than in English.

We were able to search for the same word in multiple languages, to ensure that we’re not only getting English-speaking results. Ten languages was the maximum we were able to add, so we added the most commonly spoken languages around the world, excluding languages like French in which the word is the same as in English. That means there is still some bias in this data towards countries that either speak English or speak the most-spoken languages in the world.

We attempted to counteract this bias by swapping in other languages around the world to see if the rankings changed. Generally, there was no change, with the exception of Vietnam and Thailand. For example, when adding Swahili, Kenya’s ranking stayed the same, and no other East African countries appeared on the list.

Here’s what the search looked like:

google trends search meditation city languages
Google Trends search for “meditation” in 10 of the most common global languages

Why don’t East Asian countries rank higher?

Given East Asia’s historical ties to Buddhism and Buddhism’s relationship to meditation, we were surprised to see lower-than-expected rankings for countries like Japan, South Korea and the southeast Asian countries.

We included Chinese, Korean, and Japanese in the initial search, and then swapped out languages one at a time to test Thai, Vietnamese, Khmer, Laotian and Burmese. After doing that, we found that Vietnam jumped significantly higher in the rankings (both here and on our Most Popular Cities for Meditation list). Thailand jumped a few places higher. Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar didn’t show up, even when the languages spoken in those countries were added.

While this is surprising given this region’s historical ties to meditation, one issue with this data is that Google is blocked in China, and isn’t the dominant search engine in South Korea. So although that shouldn’t change the relative search volume, the sample size for those two countries is smaller than we’d expect. More importantly, meditation, while historically integrated into East Asian culture, hasn’t always been seen as something practiced by the general population. So while you might expect meditation to be especially popular in places like Tokyo, Beijing and Seoul, that isn’t necessarily the case, especially since meditation has grown rapidly over the last two decades in other countries around the world.

As the modern mindfulness meditation movement grows, we can expect this data to change.

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